How to build a wicking bed

Wicking beds are extremely water efficient and time efficient compared to other forms of garden beds. They require very little watering, except 5 – 10 minutes filling up the water reservoir once a week in summer.

Wicking beds are extremely water efficient and time efficient compared to other forms of garden beds. They require very little watering, except 5 – 10 minutes filling up the water reservoir once a week in summer.

They can be any size from a broccoli box on a balcony to a 6 metre raised bed in a sunny place in your garden. The critical component is that the water reservoir is levelled.

As the wicking bed is self-contained the growing bed can be adapted for any plant requirement, alkaline, acid or neutral, depending on what you want to plant.

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How to build a raised garden bed.

A raised garden bed is one that is built off the ground, usually in some form of boxed structure. It requires no digging – the worms do that for you – which improves the structure of the soil and increases its nutrient value.

 

A raised garden bed is one that is built off the ground, usually in some form of boxed structure. It requires no digging – the worms do that for you – which improves the structure of the soil and increases its nutrient value.

 

As a raised bed is self-contained the growing bed can be adapted for any plant requirement, alkaline, acid or neutral, depending on what you want to plant.

 

The bed should be narrow enough to reach across it without bending your back too much from either side, the best width is about 1.2 metres. This allows for easy access with no bending double, kneeling or squatting.

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Reversed Perceptions

We all have issues, as well as undesirable qualities or traits that we don’t like about ourselves. Most of us realize that we are not perfect and that it is natural to have unpleasant thoughts, motivations, desires, or feelings.

When we take ownership of our thoughts we are less likely to project our issues or disowned qualities onto others.

 

We all have issues, as well as undesirable qualities or traits that we don’t like about ourselves. Most of us realize that we are not perfect and that it is natural to have unpleasant thoughts, motivations, desires, or feelings. However, when a person does not acknowledge these, they may ascribe those characteristics to someone else, deeming other people instead as angry, jealous, or insecure. In psychological terms, such blaming and fault finding is called projection.

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